Occupational Therapist Salary

If you're looking to maximize your earnings, you've come to the right place. We offer top occupational therapy salaries in all 50 U.S. states.

How much is the salary of an occupational therapist?

Your earning potential as an OT depends on your years of education and amount of experience, as well as your credentials, the clinical settings you have experience with, any specializations, and the position type you're seeking - for example, a travel occupational therapy job versus a permanent position. Occupational therapist salaries in some markets go up to six figures. According to salary.com, in 2018 the median annual Occupational Therapist salary is $84,062, and typically ranges between $76,000 and -$91,000. In addition, a traveling occupational therapist salary is augmented by extra benefits that will increase the OT's annual earnings.

Urban Markets Drive Occupational Therapist Salaries to New Heights

Demand for occupational therapy is greatest in cities with populated work centers and parts of the country with retirees. Hospitals and rehabilitation centers in these communities typically offer high traveling occupational therapist salary in exchange for years of experience, sound leadership qualities, and a thorough working knowledge of modern therapies.

What Can I Expect from Jobs in Travel Occupational Therapy?

Occupational therapy jobs in travel are personally and professionally rewarding. They allow you a high degree of freedom and flexibility, as you can pick OT travel jobs in the geographic and clinical area that interest you, choose when you work, and pursue positions that will add to your specializations, skills, and experience. Most assignments are 3 to 6 months in length, meaning that you have the chance to pursue a variety of opportunities that will help you achieve your personal and professional goals.

Are Travel Occupational Therapist Salaries Really Better than Staff Pay?

This depends on a number of factors, many of which reflect on a healthcare provider’s profitability. For instance, a ‘for-profit’ hospital may be likely to provide higher occupational therapist salaries than a 'non-profit.' Then again, a non-profit located in an isolated city or town may be willing to pay a premium for a traveler if a therapist can’t be sourced locally. Employers such as skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), outpatient centers, and ambulatory rehab centers also pay well.  Our recruiters can tell you more!

When the high pay and lucrative travel benefits are considered together, traveling occupational therapist salaries are normally higher than permanent staff, and achieving a higher income is well within reach.